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Orfebreria Y Chamanismo Pdf Download


Orfebreria Y Chamanismo Pdf Download: A Guide to the Gold and Shamanism of Pre-Columbian Colombia




If you are interested in learning more about the fascinating culture and art of the ancient peoples of Colombia, you might want to download a PDF copy of the book Orfebreria y Chamanismo: Un Estudio Iconografico del Museo del Oro del Banco de la Republica, Colombia by Gerardo Reichel-Dolmatoff. This book, which translates to Goldwork and Shamanism: An Iconographic Study of the Gold Museum of the Bank of the Republic, Colombia, is a comprehensive and insightful analysis of the symbolic and religious meanings of the gold objects displayed in the museum.


The Gold Museum of Bogota is one of the most important cultural attractions in Colombia, as it houses the largest collection of pre-Columbian gold artifacts in the world. The museum showcases more than 34,000 pieces of gold and other materials from various indigenous cultures that inhabited the territory before the Spanish conquest. The gold objects range from simple ornaments and tools to elaborate figurines and ceremonial items that reflect the cosmology, mythology, and ritual practices of these ancient civilizations.


DOWNLOAD: https://t.co/KCcIm2ExaE


Reichel-Dolmatoff, who was a renowned anthropologist and expert on Colombian indigenous cultures, wrote this book in 2005 as a result of his extensive research on the iconography and symbolism of the goldwork. He argues that the gold objects are not merely decorative or functional, but rather they are expressions of a complex and sophisticated system of beliefs and knowledge that revolves around shamanism. Shamanism is a form of religious experience that involves the communication with spiritual beings and forces through altered states of consciousness, usually induced by psychoactive plants, music, or dance.


The book explores how the gold objects represent different aspects of the shamanic worldview, such as the creation of the universe, the structure of reality, the role of animals and plants, the cycles of life and death, and the healing and transformation processes. Reichel-Dolmatoff also explains how the gold objects were used in different contexts and ceremonies, such as initiation rites, divination, healing, warfare, fertility, and funerary rituals. He also compares and contrasts the similarities and differences among the various cultural groups that produced the goldwork, such as the Muisca, Quimbaya, Calima, Tairona, Sinu, Tierradentro, San Agustin, Nariño, Tolima, and others.


The book is richly illustrated with photographs and drawings of the gold objects, as well as maps, diagrams, and tables that help to understand their meaning and function. The book also includes a bibliography and an index for further reference. The book is written in Spanish, but it is accessible to anyone who has a basic knowledge of the language or who can use an online translator tool.


If you want to download a PDF copy of this book for free, you can visit [this link], which will take you to an online archive where you can find the book in digital format. You can also find other related documents and e-books on [this link] or [this link]. Alternatively, you can visit the official website of the Gold Museum [here] to learn more about its history, collections, exhibitions, and activities.


We hope you enjoy reading this book and learning more about the fascinating goldwork and shamanism of pre-Columbian Colombia! The article is already quite long, but I can try to add some more information. Here is a possible continuation: Some Examples of Goldwork and Shamanism in Pre-Columbian Colombia




In this section, we will present some examples of the gold objects that illustrate the shamanic worldview and practices of the pre-Columbian cultures of Colombia. These examples are taken from the book Orfebreria y Chamanismo by Reichel-Dolmatoff, and they are also displayed in the Gold Museum of Bogota.


  • The Muisca Raft: This is one of the most famous and iconic pieces of goldwork in Colombia. It depicts a scene from the Muisca mythology, in which the new ruler of the Muisca people undergoes a ritual of investiture in the sacred lake of Guatavita. The ruler, who is standing on a raft made of reeds, is surrounded by his attendants and offerings of gold and precious stones. He is also covered in gold dust, which he will throw into the lake as a symbol of his connection with the sun god. The raft represents the cosmic axis that connects the three levels of reality: the underworld, the earth, and the sky. The ruler acts as a shaman who can travel between these realms and communicate with the gods.



  • The Quimbaya Poporo: A poporo is a device used by indigenous peoples to consume coca leaves, which are a psychoactive plant that induces altered states of consciousness. The poporo consists of a container that holds the coca leaves, and a stick that is used to crush them and mix them with lime. The lime helps to extract the alkaloids from the leaves and enhance their effects. The Quimbaya poporo is a remarkable example of goldwork, as it is made of solid gold and has intricate geometric patterns and animal motifs. The poporo symbolizes the union of opposites, such as male and female, earth and sky, life and death. The coca leaves represent the feminine principle, while the lime represents the masculine principle. The stick represents the phallus, while the container represents the womb. The consumption of coca leaves is a way of achieving harmony and balance between these forces.



  • The Tairona Pendant: This is a beautiful pendant made of gold and tumbaga, an alloy of gold and copper. It depicts a human figure with an elaborate headdress, earrings, necklace, bracelets, and belt. The figure also has wings, claws, and a tail, which indicate that it is a hybrid being that combines human and animal features. The pendant represents a shaman in a state of transformation, as he or she acquires the attributes and powers of different animals. The animals are usually associated with specific qualities and abilities, such as strength, speed, vision, flight, etc. The shaman can use these abilities to perform various tasks, such as healing, divination, protection, or warfare.



These are just some examples of the many gold objects that reveal the rich and complex shamanic culture of pre-Columbian Colombia. If you want to see more examples and learn more about their meanings and functions, you can download the PDF book Orfebreria y Chamanismo by Reichel-Dolmatoff [here], or visit the Gold Museum of Bogota [here]. The article is already quite long, but I can try to add some more information. Here is a possible continuation: Some Examples of Goldwork and Shamanism in Pre-Columbian Colombia




In this section, we will present some examples of the gold objects that illustrate the shamanic worldview and practices of the pre-Columbian cultures of Colombia. These examples are taken from the book Orfebreria y Chamanismo by Reichel-Dolmatoff, and they are also displayed in the Gold Museum of Bogota.


  • The Muisca Raft: This is one of the most famous and iconic pieces of goldwork in Colombia. It depicts a scene from the Muisca mythology, in which the new ruler of the Muisca people undergoes a ritual of investiture in the sacred lake of Guatavita. The ruler, who is standing on a raft made of reeds, is surrounded by his attendants and offerings of gold and precious stones. He is also covered in gold dust, which he will throw into the lake as a symbol of his connection with the sun god. The raft represents the cosmic axis that connects the three levels of reality: the underworld, the earth, and the sky. The ruler acts as a shaman who can travel between these realms and communicate with the gods.



  • The Quimbaya Poporo: A poporo is a device used by indigenous peoples to consume coca leaves, which are a psychoactive plant that induces altered states of consciousness. The poporo consists of a container that holds the coca leaves, and a stick that is used to crush them and mix them with lime. The lime helps to extract the alkaloids from the leaves and enhance their effects. The Quimbaya poporo is a remarkable example of goldwork, as it is made of solid gold and has intricate geometric patterns and animal motifs. The poporo symbolizes the union of opposites, such as male and female, earth and sky, life and death. The coca leaves represent the feminine principle, while the lime represents the masculine principle. The stick represents the phallus, while the container represents the womb. The consumption of coca leaves is a way of achieving harmony and balance between these forces.



  • The Tairona Pendant: This is a beautiful pendant made of gold and tumbaga, an alloy of gold and copper. It depicts a human figure with an elaborate headdress, earrings, necklace, bracelets, and belt. The figure also has wings, claws, and a tail, which indicate that it is a hybrid being that combines human and animal features. The pendant represents a shaman in a state of transformation, as he or she acquires the attributes and powers of different animals. The animals are usually associated with specific qualities and abilities, such as strength, speed, vision, flight, etc. The shaman can use these abilities to perform various tasks, such as healing, divination, protection, or warfare.



These are just some examples of the many gold objects that reveal the rich and complex shamanic culture of pre-Columbian Colombia. If you want to see more examples and learn more about their meanings and functions, you can download the PDF book Orfebreria y Chamanismo by Reichel-Dolmatoff [here], or visit t


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